Future of Creativity
 
 

At a glance, rapidly arriving change is instantly visible.

 
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quick overview

Current trends and projections.

 
 


So much is changing. So much has changed. And much more will change in the coming decade. As we travel and meet new people, we are constantly sourcing research and insights from some of the most inspiring individuals and the greatest institutions in the world. 

As individuals continue to tackle the ever-shifting challenges of an evolving creative economy, we are interested in learning how people adapt, thrive, and excel in a climate of uncertainty. 

Currently thirty-four percent of the U.S. working population is on 1099, working as an independent contractor. Most are fully independent freelancers, some moonlight working evenings and weekends on top of full time employment, and others juggle a disparate array of several part-time contract jobs. By 2030, the percentage will increase to fifty percent. These are statistics never before seen in modern U.S. economic history. When surveyed, many of these independent contractors say they prefer the flexibility in work and schedule, the opportunity to take or refuse work, and in general, the facade of personal control.

 

Snap shot of basic labor statistics

 

34%

U.S. WORKING POPULATION ON 1099 IN 2015

50%

U.S. WORKING POPULATION ON 1099 IN 2030

50%

U.S. JOBS WILL BE AUTOMATED BY 2033

 
 

40%

GLOBAL WORKING AGE POPULATION UNEMPLOYED, INACTIVE, OR PART-TIME in 2015

840M

GLOBAL WORKING AGE POPULATION UNEMPLOYED, INACTIVE, OR PART-TIME in 2015

4.1BN

PEOPLE currently without ACCESS TO THE INTERNET

 


“Independent workers are the world’s largest workforce.”

 
 
 
 

“We will all need creative visions for how our lives are organized and valued in the future, in a world where the role and meaning of work start to shift.”

JAMES MANYIKA
Chairman of
 the McKinsey Global Institute

 
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Talent Resources

Global talent collaboration: simple, efficient, scalable.

 
 

 

Most simply, online talent platforms connect the right people to the right opportunities at the right time. A recent report by McKinsey & Co presented stunning research on the power of online talent platforms — an industry in its infancy — which could boost global GDP by $2.7 trillion as early as 2025.  The global labor market has not kept pace with rapid innovation of the world economy, causing significant inefficiencies. 

Millions of people struggle to find work, while employers can not fill open positions. Many of those who are working often feel overqualified or underutilized.

Businesses must be at the forefront of the changing demands of the workforce, which will require them to rethink talent recruitment and management, reevaluate tools and processes supporting work activities, and ultimately prepare staff for a new world of work.

 

 

Online talent platforms such as Upwork, TopTal, Crew, Working Not Working, People as a Service and People Per Hour (yes, those two are real company names), LiquidTalent, and more will help increase global GDP by two percent ($2.7T) within the next decade through two simple factors: creating greater efficiency in communication and transparent accountability structures in the management of distributed, contract labor.

This growth increases employment by 72 million full-time-equivalent positions. Online talent platforms quickly level the global playing field, providing instant access to any global labor market with access to stable internet. These same platforms can potentially increase employee productivity and simultaneously reduce the costs and efforts of recruitment and talent management.

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Snap shot of basic statistics

36%

Global employers cannot find the talent they need.

40%

GLOBAL WORKING AGE POPULATION UNEMPLOYED, INACTIVE, OR PART-TIME in 2015

 

38MM

Full Time Employees potentially displaced in the United States by 2030 due to automation.

$2.7T

online talent platforms could boost global GDP by 2025

 
 

“While labor productivity has more than doubled since 1965, digital infrastructures such as computing capacity have improved 8 million times over.”

 
 
 

The future of work could create more good jobs, if organizational leaders are able to evolve their jobs by crafting them to make the most out of their employees’ inherent nature to be social creatures and creative problem-solvers.”

JEFF SCHWARTZ
Principle at Deloitte — Human Capital Marketing, Eminence, and Brand

 
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Expanding Skills

As technology changes jobs, one’s skills must evolve.

 
 

As work becomes increasingly augmented by technology, our capacity frees up for higher-order cognitive tasks. Automation and AI will quickly render many jobs and mundane activities obsolete, which will fundamentally reshape our understanding of work, how to create and capture value, and require evolving skill sets.

As the ever-growing number of online platforms continue to make the execution of ideas more and more efficient, individuals must develop and nurture effective soft skills — especially creative problem-solving and the ability to put thought to paper. Some research predicts more than 30 percent of high-paying new jobs will likely be social and essentially human in nature, therefore individuals must be able to adroitly commingle technical knowledge and cognitive social skills, such as connecting with other people and communicating effectively.

To lead in the future of work, individuals and organizations must master both technical and social skill sets, as well as reimagine life long education.  Ecosystems will be required to rethink educating their teams and establish a framework to help everyone develop their talent more rapidly.

 

 
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“These shifts could evolve workforces to create and capture more value by reinventing work through essentially human learning and discovery.”

 
 
 

We no longer learn to work, but rather work to learn. As a result, in the new landscape of work, personal success will largely depend on accelerating learning throughout one’s lifetime.”

HEATHER STOCKTON
Principle at Deloitte — Global Human Capital Executive
Leading the Future of Work Program

 
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A Few Stats to Consider While Pondering Our Collective Future.

 
 

50M

New Tech jobs by 2030

20M

potential new jobs from energy investments

1/3

Of the workforce in U.S. & Germany might need to find new occupations

 
 

138M

Growth in India’s labor force by 2030

15%

of work could be displaced by automation by 2030

250M

number of new jobs net of automation that could be created to 2030 by rising incomes